Collaboration tools like Slack and its many alternatives are designed to make collaborating with others much smoother. In recent years, Microsoft released Microsoft Teams, which has risen to be a major Slack alternative for those organizations that were looking for something that would integrate with their current Microsoft Office environment.

This blog explores Slack and Microsoft Teams and provides a more in-depth look of the pros and cons of each platform to help you determine which one is a better option for your organization.

 

Slack Microsoft Teams
Price Free
Standard ($6.67/month)
Plus ($12.50/month)
Dependent on the version of Office 365 you purchase
Uploading Files Desktop
Multiple 3rd Party Integrations for online file sharing needs
Desktop
Users can use their OneDrive/SharePoint document libraries for online file sharing needs
Creating/Editing Files Can use 3rd party apps to create/edit files Can use Word/Excel/PowerPoint Online to create/edit files
Search Capabilities Can search messages and files Can search messages, people, and files
Project/Task Management Capabilities Can use 3rd party apps to manage projects/tasks Can use MS Planner or 3rd party apps to manage projects/tasks
Audio/Video Calls Yes Yes (powered by Skype for Business)
Notes Can take notes using Posts Can take notes using built-in OneNote capabilities
Operating Systems Mac, Windows, Linux, iOS, Android Mac, Windows, iOS, Android

 

Collaboration Tool #1: Slack

Compatible with a variety of operating systems, Slack helps users simplify communication, stay in touch with one another, and streamline workflows. Teams in your organization can communicate in groups or through semi-private or private chats, share folders or files simply (just drag and drop them into the correct channel), and refer back to previous conversations with the searchable archive that Slack builds.

Integrating with several enterprise and productivity products that are on the market, Slack’s open API also provides your team with the opportunity to build their own apps if they’re so inclined. Slack is also highly customizable, allowing users to change the appearance (theme) of their platform, or change their notification or channel settings if desired.

Pros:

  • Slack is web-based, so users can access it from anywhere using their mobile devices, tablets or desktop – all you need is an Internet connection.
  • With prices ranging from just over $6 to just under $13 per user, per month, Slack is a good option for SMBs that want to incorporate an easy-to-use communication platform.
  • Slack provides an app download centre that allows you to search for and download the apps you need.
  • Content on Slack is controlled by your organization’s admin, who can choose to make the data public or private.

Cons:

  • Slack does not come with native applications, so all apps will need to be linked to third-party providers.
  • Because there are no native applications, there is no built-in calendar or task management capabilities within Slack – you’ll need to download an app for that.
  • The free version of Slack does not come with any administrative rights or controls.

Slack vs. Slack Alternative (Microsoft Teams)Source

 

Collaboration Tool #2: Microsoft Teams, the Slack Alternative

With Microsoft Teams, you can stay connected through private or small group conversations with your team members, and manage your conversations, files, and tools in one convenient location. Teams should be used to connect and collaborate with those whom you’re working with on a regular basis, want to share content with, and trust to manage that content.

Its biggest strength is the fact that Microsoft Teams seamlessly integrates with Office 365 (Teams is included in many of the Office 365 licences), so if your organization is already running a Microsoft environment, this is a great way to extend the collaboration to familiar tools like Word, Excel, PowerPoint, OneNote, SharePoint, and other Office files.

Pros:

  • Microsoft Teams supports threaded conversations and in-line reply messaging, making it easier to follow conversations within a group.
  • Microsoft Teams is multi-lingual, with 18 languages built into it, and chat is capable in the user’s native language.
  • Users can build in custom tabs as required.
  • Integrated with Skype for Business, Microsoft Teams has the capability for screen sharing, audio, and video calls.
  • Microsoft Teams is a part of the Office 365 platform, so users can take advantage of Office 365’s business functionality, including accessing documents through OneDrive or SharePoint, or conducting Skype meetings from the Teams platform.

Cons:

  • Currently, Microsoft Teams doesn’t have the same selection of app integrations as Slack does – the Slack App Directory is more expansive.
  • Cross-platform user interface is not as accessible as it is in Slack – to be a part of Teams, users need to be using a business version of the Office 365.
  • Microsoft Teams does not directly support the import or export of content.

Slack vs. Slack Alternative (Microsoft Teams)

Source

 

Slack vs Microsoft Teams, the Slack Alternative – Which one is right for you?

In determining which group chat option is right for your organization, it’s important to consider a few important factors, such as budget, user experience, and features you need within your organization.

If you’re already using Office 365, your license may give you access to Microsoft Teams. Not sure if it does or how to get started? Drop us a line or use the live chat function to connect immediately.

 

 

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